Digital Mammography

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in Indian women (after cervical cancer) and the most common in Urban Indian population. Early detection remains the best tool in the fight against breast cancer. Breast self-exams, clinical breast exams, and screening mammography play key roles in uncovering disease at an early stage, when the mortality rate can be reduced significantly. Compared to traditional radiography, mammography offers a considerably higher spatial and contrast resolution, allowing for the early detection of even the smallest changes in soft tissue.

The system offers outstanding versatility and patient comfort. The Isocentric X-ray tube can rotate up to -180°/ +135° which enables comfortable scanning in any projection. The unique pivoting bucky table enables quick and easy switching between 18 cm x 24 cm and 24 cm x 30 cm formats. This makes it an optimal system for almost all women and breast sizes. A wide array of compression plates ensures gentle compression optimized for each individual breast. The open design means excellent access, for patients even in a wheelchair, in standing, sitting or recumbent positions.

Services Available at:

  • Atulaya Healthcare, Chandigarh
  • Atulaya Healthcare, Ludhiana
  • Escorts Heart Institute, Faridabad
  • Fortis Hospital, Shalimar Bagh
  • Atulaya Healthcare, Muktsar

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FAQs

Mammography is a specific type of imaging that uses a low-dose x-ray system to examine breasts. A mammography exam, called a mammogram, is used to aid in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women.

An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

Mammograms are used as a screening tool to detect early breast cancer in women experiencing no symptoms and to detect and diagnose breast disease in women experiencing symptoms such as a lump, pain or nipple discharge.

People with following conditions are at greater risks:

  • Age > 40 years
  • Family history of breast cancer in first or second degree relatives.
  • Menstrual history :
  • Early menopause
  • Late menopause
  • Exposure to X-rays
  • Hormone replacement therapy
  • Obesity

Before scheduling a mammogram, we recommend that you discuss any new findings or problems in your breasts with your doctor. In addition, inform your doctor of any prior surgeries, hormone use, and family or personal history of breast cancer.

Do not schedule your mammogram for the week before your period if your breasts are usually tender during this time. The best time for a mammogram is one week following your period. Always inform your doctor or x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that you are pregnant.

We also recommend you:

  • Do not wear deodorant, talcum powder or lotion under your arms or on your breasts on the day of the exam. These can appear on the mammogram as calcium spots.
  • Describe any breast symptoms or problems to the technologist performing the exam.
  • If possible, obtain prior mammograms and make them available to the radiologist at the time of the current exam.
  • Ask when your results will be available; do not assume the results are normal if you do not hear from your doctor or the mammography facility.

A mammography unit is a rectangular box that houses the tube in which x-rays are produced. The unit is used exclusively for x-ray exams of the breast, with special accessories that allow only the breast to be exposed to the x-rays. Attached to the unit is a device that holds and compresses the breast and positions it so images can be obtained at different angles.

X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special digital image recording plate.

Mammography is performed on an outpatient basis.

During mammography, a specially qualified radiologic technologist will position your breast in the mammography unit. Your breast will be placed on a special platform and compressed with a paddle (often made of clear Plexiglas or other plastic). The technologist will gradually compress your breast.

Breast compression is necessary in order to:

  • Even out the breast thickness so that all of the tissue can be visualized.
  • Spread out the tissue so that small abnormalities are less likely to be obscured by overlying breast tissue.
  • Allow the use of a lower x-ray dose since a thinner amount of breast tissue is being imaged.
  • Hold the breast still in order to minimize blurring of the image caused by motion.
  • Reduce x-ray scatter to increase sharpness of picture.

You will be asked to change positions between images. The routine views are a top-to-bottom view and an oblique side view. The process will be repeated for the other breast.

You must hold very still and may be asked to keep from breathing for a few seconds while the x-ray picture is taken to reduce the possibility of a blurred image. The technologist will walk behind a wall or into the next room to activate the x-ray machine.

When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained.

The examination process should take about 30 minutes.

You will feel pressure on your breast as it is squeezed by the compression paddle. Some women with sensitive breasts may experience discomfort. If this is the case, schedule the procedure when your breasts are least tender. Be sure to inform the technologist if pain occurs as compression is increased. If discomfort is significant, less compression will be used.