Clinical Lab Test

At Atulaya Healthcare Chandigarh all clinical Lab test Service is available.AllBiochemical,pathological and Haematological test are performed.

Clinical Lab Test Available at following locations:

  • Atulaya Healthcare, Chandigarh
  • Atulaya Healthcare, Jammu
  • Atulaya Healthcare, Muktsar

FAQs

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that attacks the immune system, the body’s natural defense system. Without a strong immune system, the body has trouble fighting off disease. Both the virus and the infection it causes are called HIV.

White blood cells are an important part of the immune system. HIV invades and destroys certain white blood cells called CD4+ cells. If too many CD4+ cells are destroyed, the body can no longer defend itself against infection.

The last stage of HIV infection is AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). People with AIDS have a low number of CD4+ cells and get infections or cancers that rarely occur in healthy people. These can be deadly.

But having HIV does not mean you have AIDS. Even without treatment, it takes a long time for HIV to progress to AIDS—usually 10 to 12 years. If HIV is diagnosed before it becomes AIDS, medicines can slow or stop the damage to the immune system. With treatment, many people with HIV are able to live long and active lives.

The tests that detect HIV antibodies in urine, fluid from the mouth (oral fluid), or blood can diagnose HIV. If a test on urine or oral fluid shows that you are infected with HIV, you will probably need a blood test to confirm the results. If you have been exposed to HIV, your immune system will make antibodies to try to destroy the virus. Blood tests can find these antibodies in your blood.

Most doctors use two blood tests, called the ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and the Western blot assay. If the first ELISA is positive (meaning that HIV antibodies are found), the blood sample is tested again. If the second test is positive, the doctor will do a Western blot to be sure. ?It may take as long as 6 months for HIV antibodies to show up in a blood sample. If you think you have been exposed to HIV but you test negative for it.

Get tested again in 6 months to be sure you are not infected.

And Once Detected Further Tests Are can be done such as:

• Viral load: Measures the amount of HIV in your blood, so you want this number to be as low as possible. One key goal of HIV treatment is to achieve and maintain a viral load that is “undetectable.”

• A person with HIV can have a viral load anywhere between less than 50 copies to over 1,000,000 copies per milliliter of blood (copies/mL). Less than 50 copies/mL is considered undetectable.

• CD4 cell count: Determines how many infection-fighting cells (also called T-helper cells) you have, so you want this number to be as high as possible. One key goal of HIV treatment is to increase your CD4 count, which makes your immune system stronger.

• CD4 cell counts between 500 and 1,500 per milliliter of blood are considered normal. AIDS begins when the CD4 count is less than 200. The following tests are used to monitor your overall health and to let you and your healthcare provider know if any of your meds are causing side effects or other problems.

No Special Preparation is required.

Blood Test: The health professional (phlebotomist) drawing blood will:

  • Wrap an elastic band (tourniquet) around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein.
  • Clean the needle site with alcohol.
  • Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. Attach ?a tube to the needle to fill it with blood.
  • Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected.
  • Apply a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.
  • Apply pressure to the site and then a bandage.

Breast cancer (malignant breast neoplasm) is cancer originating from breast tissue, most commonly from the inner lining of milk ducts or the lobules that supply the ducts with milk.Cancers originating from ducts are known as ductal carcinomas; those originating from lobules are known as lobular carcinomas. Breast cancer is a disease of humans and other mammals; while the overwhelming majority of cases in humans are women, men can also contract breast cancer.

Some tests for breast cancer are performed on the patient’s blood; others are done on a sample of cells or the tumour tissue.

For Blood Test: There is no special preparation required for blood test.

For Tissue Test: Your doctor needs to extract the affected tissue so you need to send the same for testing in the pathology lab.

No Special Preparation is required.

Blood Test: The health professional (phlebotomist) drawing blood will:

  • Wrap an elastic band (tourniquet) around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein.
  • Clean the needle site with alcohol.
  • Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. Attach ?a tube to the needle to fill it with blood.
  • Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected.
  • Apply a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.
  • Apply pressure to the site and then a bandage

Allergy testing involves having a skin or blood test to find out what substance, or allergen, may trigger an allergic response in a person. Skin tests are usually done because they are rapid, reliable, and generally less expensive than blood tests, but either type of test may be used.

Blood test

Allergy blood tests look for substances in the blood called antibodies. Blood tests are not as sensitive as skin tests but are often used for people who are not able to have skin tests.

The most common type of blood test used is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, EIA). It measures the blood level of a type of antibody (called immunoglobulin E, or IgE) that the body may make in response to certain allergens. IgE levels are often higher in people who have allergies or asthma.

Other lab testing methods, such as radioallergosorbent testing (RAST) or an immunoassay capture test (ImmunoCAP, UniCAP, or Pharmacia CAP), may be used to provide more information.

Allergy testing is done to find out what substances (allergens) cause an allergic reaction.

No Special Preparation is required.

Blood Test: The health professional (phlebotomist) drawing blood will:

  • Wrap an elastic band (tourniquet) around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein.
  • Clean the needle site with alcohol.
  • Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. Attach ?a tube to the needle to fill it with blood.
  • Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected.
  • Apply a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.
  • Apply pressure to the site and then a bandage.

Tuberculosis, MTB or TB (short for tubercle bacillus) is a common and in many cases lethal infectious disease caused by various strains of mycobacteria, usually Mycobacterium tuberculosis.[1] Tuberculosis usually attacks the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body. It is spread through the air when people who have an active MTB infection cough, sneeze, or otherwise transmit their saliva through the air.[2] Most infections in humans result in an asymptomatic, latent infection, and about one in ten latent infections eventually progresses to active disease, which, if left untreated, kills more than 50% of its victim.

Mantoux tuberculin skin tests are often used for routine screening of high risk individual.

No Special Preparation is required.

Blood Test: The health professional (phlebotomist) drawing blood will:

  • Wrap an elastic band (tourniquet) around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein.
  • Clean the needle site with alcohol.
  • Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. Attach a tube to the needle to fill it with blood.
  • Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected.
  • Apply a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.
  • Apply pressure to the site and then a bandage.

The rheumatoid factor (RF) test is primarily used to help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or Sjögren syndrome and to help distinguish them from other forms of arthritis or other conditions that cause similar symptoms. While diagnoses of RA and Sjögren syndrome rely heavily on the clinical picture, some of the signs and symptoms may not be present or follow a typical pattern, especially early in these diseases. Furthermore, the signs and symptoms may not always be clearly identifiable since people with these diseases may also have other connective tissue disorders or conditions, such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, scleroderma, autoimmune thyroid disorders, and systemic lupus erythematosis, and display symptoms of these disorders as well. The RF test is one tool among others that can be used to help make a diagnosis when RA or Sjörgren syndrome is suspected.

The RF test may be ordered along with other autoimmune-related tests, such as an ANA (antinuclear antibody), and other markers of inflammation, such as a CRP (C-reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), as well as a CBC (Complete Blood Count) to evaluate the body’s blood cells. A CCP (Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibody) test, a relatively new test that can help detect early RA, may be ordered if the RF is negative.

The RF test may also be ordered, along with tests such as anti-SS-A and anti-SS-B to help diagnose Sjögren syndrome.

RA is diagnosed through anti CCP test

ANTI CCP: Anti cyclic citrillumnated peptide.

No Special Preparation is required.

Blood Test: The health professional (phlebotomist) drawing blood will:

  • Wrap an elastic band (tourniquet) around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein.
  • Clean the needle site with alcohol.
  • Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. Attach a tube to the needle to fill it with blood.
  • Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected.
  • Apply a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.
  • Apply pressure to the site and then a bandage.

Some of the few test where important requirement is needed